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SPECIAL: My Social Marketing Nightmare

social media

 

We all know the potential power of social media marketing "if we get it right". However, keeping up the tempo across multiple platforms slowly turns from a pleasure into a nightmare.

 

Imagine a team of experts managing, posting and measuring results to improve positioning for you on all the major platforms. Imagine no more, the team is yours.

 

Strategy

We recommend running a campaign for 3 months, we analyse the results and focus on your successes for the next period.

Special-Offer

 

 
FREE with any Social Media Package
  • - Setup & branding on 6 platforms
  • - Professional email system setup
  • - Branded email template
  • - Subscription form to your mailer

 

Packages are limited

Because we focus on custom solutions and R value results we limit the number of clients per package. When clients move and open slots we make them available to you again

Currently Open Slots

- Daily Pack: Max 10 Left 3

- Weekly Pack: Max 20 Left 18

- Monthly Pack: Max 100 Left 94

 

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Give the eye a place to stop

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A good visual hierarchy can be used to separate out your important elements from the less important ones. A visual hierarchy results from varying such things as alignment, proximity, colour, tone, indentation, font size, element size, padding, spacing, etc. When these visual language elements are applied correctly, they can work together to direct and pause people’s attention within a page - improving general readability. A visual hierarchy can be said to generate friction and slows us down from skimming through the full page top to bottom - for the better that is. With a good visual hierarchy, although we might spend a bit more time on the page, the end result should be that we register more items and characteristics. Think of it as as road trip. You can take the highway and get to your destination quicker (bottom of page), or you can take the scenic route and remember more interesting things along the way. Give the eye a place to stop.


 Try Grouping Related Items instead of disordering

Grouping related items together is a basic way of increasing fundamental usability. Most of us tend to know that a knife and a fork, or open and save functions can typically be found more or less together. Related items are just meant to be placed in proximity of each other in order to respect a degree of logic and lower overall cognitive friction. Wasting time looking for stuff usually isn't fun for people.


 Try Inline Validation instead of delaying errors

When dealing with forms and errors, it’s usually better to try to detect if something isn’t correct and show it sooner rather than later. The famous interaction pattern highlighted here of course is inline validation. By showing an error message as it happens (say to the right of the input field), it can be corrected right then and there as it appears in context. On the other hand, when error messages are displayed later on (say after a submit), it forces people to do some additional cognitive work of having to recall what they were doing from a few steps back.

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